WIGHTLINK ANNOUNCES THAT NEW FISHBOURNE FERRY WILL BE FULLY ELECTRIC

Wightlink is pledging to further reduce its carbon emissions significantly over the next decade, announcing that they have started the process of commissioning a new ferry that will be 100% electric.

The ferry company already operates England’s first hybrid energy ship, Victoria of Wight, which entered into service between Fishbourne and Portsmouth in 2018. The vessel’s carbon emissions are 20% lower than a diesel-powered ship.

Now, Wightlink is drawing up specifications for its next new ferry on the route. Advances in sustainable technology mean it will be possible to commission a new ship that will use electric power from batteries to an even greater extent than at present by Victoria of Wight.

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Although there are still obstacles to be overcome, Wightlink hopes that shore power can be used to charge batteries, enabling full electric operation to become a reality.

It takes 5 years to draw up plans, seek tenders and build a new ferry for the busy Solent crossing-  meaning it could be 2026 before a replacement for the ageing St Faith – which is already 31 years old – is in service.

Keith Greenfield, Chief Executive, says:

“Our aim is to operate England’s first all-electric ferry. We are working with our naval architects and technology companies to come up with the best solution to operate ferries with the lowest possible impact on the environment.”

During COP26 (31st Oct-12th Nov), Wightlink will feature in a UK Government video series about Climate Leaders. Senior Master Captain Sam Mitchell talks about how climate change is changing the world around us and how sustainable technologies, such as hybrid energy, can make a difference.

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VIDEO: Watch Captain Sam Mitchell talk about climate change…

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Grumpy old git
Grumpy old git
1 month ago

Yay, time to buy shares in Duracell then? Or will it have a long extension lead? Should they incorporate extra portholes for oars when it breaks down? Good luck to them when our electricity supplies fail in the middle of winter because all the green sources have failed. Perhaps they will have a diesel generator as a back-up power supply.

Hope Springs
Hope Springs
Reply to  Grumpy old git
1 month ago

Every green energy enthusiast will tell you that what’s needed is a balanced mix of renewable resources, including tidal and battery, so that the supplies don’t fail in the middle of winter. And I’d be surprised if the MCA didn’t insist on a diesel backup, regardless of green aspirations.

lucas
lucas
Reply to  Grumpy old git
1 month ago

Cant beat a diesel generator! I understand they have hired some for the scottish enviroment jolly to charge the battery cars the “delegates” and their associated hangers on are using to virtue signal as they fly in from all over the world in their thousands. apparently not enough charging points for the battery buggies?

tom
tom
Reply to  Grumpy old git
1 month ago

You need to educate yourself in how renewable energy works. You’re clearly stuck in last century thinking.

Dave Rivett
Dave Rivett
1 month ago

Any chance this one could be built in Britain?

Martin
Martin
Reply to  Dave Rivett
1 month ago

Expect China will prob get v nod…. though I agree the UK should b bidding

Joe Bloggs
Joe Bloggs
1 month ago

They will need a very long extension lead.

lucas
lucas
1 month ago

“Sustainable technology, such as as hybrid energy can make a difference” no it cant and never will, window dressing with a battery boat will not make the slightest difference to the enviroment. It may suit the greenwash agenda though. Concentrate on keeping the ferries running on time.

tom
tom
Reply to  lucas
1 month ago

If one person claps at the end of a performance no one will hear. But if all clap it will be herd. Yes on it’s own will make little difference, but if everyone does follows suit it WILL make a difference. But then it requires people with a brain that can see we all have to work together.

Firthy
Firthy
1 month ago

Which side will the charge it from? If here, expect more blackouts on our frail supplies as thousands of new homes drain the weak grid here.

isle of wighter
isle of wighter
Reply to  Firthy
1 month ago

the existing boat was adrift in the solent a while ago after losing all power – what do you think will happen to 100% electric -dead in the water in no time.

Firthy
Firthy
1 month ago

IF it sinks, all the people in concuctive sea water will be electrocuted and die a terrible death.

Hope Springs
Hope Springs
Reply to  Firthy
1 month ago

That’s right, Firthy, but on the bright side, at least they won’t be choked to death drowning in diesel.

The Realest
The Realest
Reply to  Firthy
1 month ago

Thermal runaway in batteries in Tesla’s is a nightmare death, one poor guy got locked inside the Tesla tomb the emergency door locks failed to open the poor guy got burned in side from the feet upwards eventually was overcome with toxic fire fumes the car has no outer door locks, fire crew used over 40,000 gallons of water over it took over 24 hours hours to put the fire out (not good for global warming), compared to a petrol car fire that uses around 500 gallons and about a half an hour to put fires out. Fire fighter are instructed not to touch EV’s on fire as there is a strong chance they might get electrocuted or batteries explode. General Motors instructed Chevy Bolt EV owners not to charge their batteries up or park them in garages overnight, as there was a chance the battery packs might experience a… Read more »

JHVF
JHVF
1 month ago

Iron out the problems with the hybrid before trying to go to the next step. We need a service not an experiment.

Colin
Colin
1 month ago

Victoria of Wight is not the first ferry in the UK to be a hybrid as there are 3 ferries operating in the Scottish isles, the first from 2013

Terence Davies
Terence Davies
1 month ago

‘The vessel’s carbon emissions are 20% lower than a diesel-powered ship’ says the report in regard to Victoria of Wight, so what then is the secret propulsion unit?

tom
tom
Reply to  Terence Davies
1 month ago

Electric. But then with someone with such a narrow view of technology it would seam like a secret power.

tom
tom
1 month ago

Based on the comments here seems the IOW schools failed to teach technology. They seem to think oil is the only way and is an endless resource. The cheapest electric is renewable energy. Coal, oil and nuclear power gets more subsidies than renewable’s yet still can not compete on cost. But I guess they are afraid that they can’t have their car go broom broom.

Brian
Brian
Reply to  tom
1 month ago

Cost of electric maybe? All
rising in prices – what the government are not telling us with heat pumps for example is how much electricity they use to operate – I know I had one – gone now – cost so much I thought I had shared in the company.

Brian
Brian
1 month ago

Now let’s all sit and think of the excuses, technical of course, why this ferry, that ferry, can’t run on such and such a day, maybe they will forget to charge the ferry as the ‘key person’ is not available….

 

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