Haydock

STEAM LOCOMOTIVE HAYDOCK JOINS ISLE OF WIGHT STEAM RAILWAY

A 145-year-old steam locomotive has arrived at the Havenstreet base of the Isle of Wight Steam Railway from Penrhyn Castle Museum in Bangor, Wales.

The locomotive Haydock has been gifted to the railway by the National Trust which is refocusing its display at Penrhyn Castle to concentrate on the industrial slate quarrying history of the area

Haydock fills an important gap in the Island collection, representing the type used in the construction period of Island railways. It is of the same design of locomotive as Freshwater, used in the construction of the Freshwater, Yarmouth & Newport Railway.

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Built by Robert Stephenson in 1879, works number 2309 (Freshwater was works number 2383), it was initially a contractor’s locomotive, and is known to have been utilised on a North Eastern Railway construction contract near Bolton Percy around 1903.

It was later acquired by Richard Evans & Co, owners of the Haydock collieries, and for many years was employed shunting their timber wharf on the Manchester Ship Canal at Acton Grange, as well as in the collieries at St Helens.  Acton Grange wharf was several miles from the Haydock mines, and apparently, the engine would work under its own steam over mainline metals between the 2 sites when required – it still carries its Railway Executive registration plate.

It passed to the National Coal Board in 1947, and from 1952 remained working at Acton Grange until rail operations ceased in 1963. During an overhaul in the 1950s it was fitted with new square topped side tanks and lost its original Salter pattern safety valves. It was stored at the NCB Central Workshops at St Helens from 1963 until 1966 when presented to the National Trust and taken to Penrhyn Castle.

The locomotive will go on static public display in the IW Steam Railway’s ‘Train Story’ exhibition centre at Havenstreet. The intention is to cosmetically return it to as-built condition and painted as Freshwater.

Peter Taylor, Chairman of the IW Steam Railway said:

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“We are extremely grateful to the National Trust for placing Haydock in our care where the locomotive will further enhance our collection for the benefit of the wider community.”

The costs of preparation and transportation to the Island have been shared between the National Trust and a group of Railway members.

Haydock made the crossing to the Isle of Wight aboard Railway sponsors Wightlink’s ferry route sailing from Portsmouth, safely transported the 300 miles by road by the stars of TV’s ‘Trucking Heavy’, Allelys Heavy Haulage.

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Balderdash
Balderdash
26 days ago

One of the few great attractions for us and visitors left here now.

fred
fred
26 days ago

Why can it not be returned to service? Money or is there a technical reason?

Quizzer
Quizzer
Reply to  fred
25 days ago

My initial thoughts were the same but having worked in restoring several locos over the years practical reasons often apply. Sometimes the money and parts for one could restore or keep running several other engines.

Bronco
Bronco
26 days ago

Well done and thanks to all involved

Marcus
Marcus
26 days ago

It must have been glorious to see these little locos chuffing across the Island in their day.

 

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