OVER 3,000 SECOND HOMES ON THE ISLE OF WIGHT ACCORDING TO NEW DATA

A staggering 1 in 20 homes on the Isle of Wight is either vacant or classed as a second home, according to the analysis on Government figures completed by campaigners Action on Empty Homes.

The campaign group found that as of October, 3,564 homes across the Island were unused – with just over 500 of these being long-term vacancies and over 3,000 being second homes. Other figures from the Ministry of Housing, Communities, and Local Government also showed that  238 children in 186 households were being housed in temporary accommodation as of September.

A Ministry of Housing, Communities, and Local Government spokesperson commented:

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“We have given councils powers and strong incentives to tackle empty homes, including the power to increase council tax by up to 300 per cent on these properties, and take over the management of homes that have been empty for a long period.

“They also receive the same New Homes Bonus for bringing an empty home back into use as for building a new one.”

Despite the high numbers, there has been a decline from last year (2020). 131 homes on the Isle of Wight are classed as being long-term empty, with the Isle of Wight Council’s definition of long-term empty homes being those which have been vacant for 2 years or more.

The council said that thanks in part to its intervention, there has been a steady decline in numbers over the last 2 years – thanks in part to the adoption of an Empty Property Strategy, aiming to bring long-term empty properties back into use, in 2019.

The Isle of Wight ranks as number 55 out of 328 councils in terms of the amount of empty properties, according to data by The Empty Homes Network.

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truth outs
truth outs
5 months ago

I don’t see why the pitchforks are out for the second homes (No, I don’t have one). In the main they are well looked after and are no problem to the local residents.

If the council are responsible for putting tenants into council houses then any empty council properties would be the responsibility of them directly. But, of course there are no actual council houses (or very few) so the problem must lay elsewhere.

If all the second homes were suddenly occupied for a full year starting tomorrow, the island would be gridlocked, so maybe the council should start a campaign for making the island the second home capital of the UK,

Smithy
Smithy
5 months ago

Absolutely disgusting. We have homeless and temporary housing and all those rich second home owners have unused property. There should be more that can be done it’s just so unfair.

Lee
Lee
Reply to  Smithy
5 months ago

I bet they are all Tories

Moi
Moi
Reply to  Lee
5 months ago

Yeah must be, because nobody buys second homes do they!

Moi
Moi
Reply to  Lee
5 months ago

Yeah must be, because nobody else buys second homes do they!

John
John
Reply to  Smithy
5 months ago

Whats the betting they are all Tories 🙂

See the Light
See the Light
5 months ago

Island councillors, Wake up and “DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT NOW”

Level Phil
Level Phil
5 months ago

That’s 3,000 too many. Only local councils and housing associations should be allowed to own more than one property, not these ‘investors’ who profit at others expense. Yet what hope is there when programmes like ‘Homes Under The Hammer’ promote this greed.

Sunshine
Sunshine
5 months ago

This isle of wight council don’t care about empty homes or empty ‘once were thriving hotel’s……they just ignore the emptiness and approve building of rabbit hutches in their hundreds

betty boo
betty boo
5 months ago

As well as second homes, an increasing number of these properties will begun to be let out on airbnb while owners away. As the popularity of the island is growing, larger numbers of people are coming down to buy up properties and turn them into money-making schemes. This will create further hostility, upset local communities, making islanders have less choice of housing stock. I am experiencing it now.

I currently live next to an airbnb which has made our families life a living hell. Communities must stand together to fight back when because otherwise the island will end up like parts of Cornwall where it’s just holiday lets

fred
fred
Reply to  betty boo
5 months ago

The island has always been and will always be a holiday destination. Don’t like it move, and when you do don’t go to another holiday destination.

betty boo
betty boo
Reply to  fred
5 months ago

Retarded answer with little thought put into it. I’m not against tourism, but tourism and accommodation that impacts negatively on locals – that work and live here FULL TIME (unlike the people that come down simply for their jollies) – is not acceptable. Is that clearer now Fred?

A. Worker
A. Worker
5 months ago

So people weren’t allowed to use their second homes during the lockdowns and now the council are moaning that they didn’t use them last year????

If all the second home owners used the facilities that they have paid for (doctors, dentists, hospital etc) those that are complaining about them wouldn’t be able to get an appointment when they wanted one.

Why does everyone assume that people have to be rich to have second homes and that they are all bought outright with no mortgage. If somebody spends 25 years buying one property and paying a mortgage, are they not allowed to buy somewhere else once they have paid their first mortgage off?

isle of wighter
isle of wighter
Reply to  A. Worker
5 months ago

NO – you only need one home – having two homes, just adds to the demand for additional housing and more concrete.

The island council should state – if you buy a home here and do not live in it all year round – then you are to pay empty rates tax on it.

truth outs
truth outs
Reply to  isle of wighter
5 months ago

Could you not apply the same logic as in having more than one child just adds to the demand for additional housing and more concrete?

isle of wighter
isle of wighter
Reply to  truth outs
5 months ago

no..truth outs, because you are forgetting that people die and the houses are sold on or passed on, which has a dampening effect on demand.

there are already too many people on this planet and we should really be looking to reduce it, not actively look for ways to destroy every inch of the planet just to accomodate more and more humans.

A. Worker
A. Worker
Reply to  isle of wighter
5 months ago

So you are saying that nobody should buy a house and rent it out, Or live in one house while working away during the week and live in another at weekends. I’m guessing you also don’t ever go on holiday and stay in accommodation owned by someone else?

I’ve worked 70 to 110 hours a week, mainly at minimum wage, for 25 years plus to pay for what I have.

I don’t holiday abroad and don’t see why I shouldn’t be allowed to buy a second property with money I’ve earned through grafting instead of wasting my money renting somebody else’s property when I want to go away.

isle of wighter
isle of wighter
Reply to  A. Worker
5 months ago

precisely a worker….you only need one permanent residence

anyone owning another home somewhere else is creating artificial demand for housing, which means more greenfields built on and less oxygen generating, co2 removing plant life.

chrisi
chrisi
5 months ago

While this is good to know, another piece of analysis needs to done. What do second homes contribute to local economies, and what is the balance. I think we would find that the local economy needs a level of second home ownership which on the IOW is concentrated to a few areas. The debate should be about affordable homes. Most homes being built aren’t affordable, we need a plan for that and at least the MP understands that even if the IOWC doesn’t

isle of wighter
isle of wighter
Reply to  chrisi
5 months ago

chrisi – second homes cost the local economy.

example

if a single individual lives in a house on the island all year round, they probably spend a minimum of £40 a week on food in the shops. £40 x 52 weeks is £2080 a year.

if a second home owner is only on the island for, say six weeks a year, that is £40 x 6 weeks – £240 a year on food.

This means the second home deprives the local economy of £1840 a year on food purchases for one person.

if we apply that to the indicated 3000 plus second homes on the island – it amounts to around £5.5m of lost revenue to the islands economy on individual food purchases alone.

basic example -point made

aircon
aircon
Reply to  isle of wighter
5 months ago

most islanders shop in multi chain supermarkets owned internationally hence the massive ques on opening day of the range and Aldi .
most tourists / second home owners visit the likes of the garlic farm ,independent retail , farm shops and local dineries .so who actually contributes to the local economy ?

Ian Carter
Ian Carter
5 months ago

Long term empty properties, as defined by MHCLG, are those that have been vacant for 6 months or more (and the Council reported this number in their CTB1 submission in October 2020). It is convenient for the Council to suggest that they are those that have been empty for over 2 years as the actual long term empty figure rose by 4% last year. The actual figure was then 510 and 490 in October 2019. This has probably risen since the submission. The Council could have made an additional £225K in New Homes Bonus funding if they had undertaken a comprehensive review of these empty properties.

Charles Dorchester
Charles Dorchester
5 months ago

We absolutely love having three second homes here on the island, we have one in seaview, one in Bembridge and one in ventnor, we have been staying on the island since February and have loved the friendships we have made with our neighbours when we do the occasional dinner or wine tasting!

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