A Rescue Demonstration Can Be Watched At The Ilc Open Day

ALL INVITED TO INSHORE LIFEBOAT CENTRE OPEN DAY TO MARK 200 YEARS OF THE RNLI

The RNLI’s Inshore Lifeboat Centre will hold its special bicentenary open day next Sunday (26th May) in celebration of the charity’s 200th anniversary.

Between 10:30 and 15:00, RNLI volunteers will carry out guided tours of the state-of-the-art factory in Clarence Road, East Cowes, where most of the lifesaving charity’s inshore lifeboats are built and maintained.

Visitors can look around the Island’s RNLI heritage and visitors centre, have a photo taken in the D class and meet the Face to Face team. Youngsters will meet RNLI mascot Stormy Stan, learn how to tie marine knots, get their faces painted, have lifejackets checked and watch afloat lifeboat demonstrations in the marina.

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A programme of live entertainment includes musical interludes from the Sea Shanty Choir The Slipshod Singers, the Cowes Concert Band, The ILC’s own Ukulele band and the famous Medina Marching Band.

The Island’s Lord Lieutenant Mrs Susie Sheldon will officially declare the day open at 10:30. A Lifeboat Naming Ceremony of a new D class Lifeboat will take place at 13:00, where the donors officially name the vessel before the lifeboat gets blessed.

Representatives from emergency services on the Island will be present, including HM Coastguard and Hampshire & Isle of Wight Fire and Rescue Service.

Everybody is welcome. Entry is free.

Glyn Ellis, Inshore Lifeboat Centre Business Operations Manager, said:

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“Come along and meet the staff who build the lifeboats and the see how the lifeboats are made during a day of family fun.

“This year’s ILC Open Day is cause for special celebration as the RNLI marks 200 years of saving lives at sea. It’s a chance to commemorate our brave crews past and present, celebrate the world-class lifesaving organisation we are today and 146,000 lives saved, and inspire the crew, supporters and volunteers of tomorrow”.

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The views/opinions expressed in these comments are solely those of the author and do not represent those of Island Echo. House rules on commenting must be followed at all times.
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Kevin P Cook
Kevin P Cook
1 month ago

Imo traitors to our nation.

Whilst they’may’ save illegals, one can’t help wondering just how many of our people will eventually suffer or lose their lives at the hands of those illegals they save.

So when you can’t afford a home, can’t find anywhere to live, can’t see a doctor or dentist, or have your women at the rape crisis centres, perhaps you will think before donating to those who aid our destruction

JAMES jenson
JAMES jenson
Reply to  Kevin P Cook
1 month ago

Whilst these crews are under obligation to save all lives, even those who ought not be in our waters, I must say I agree with you.

I shall not ever donate a penny to aid in the certain costly ruination of not only our infrastructure, but of our race.

The literally never ending amount, as they breed faster than they arrive, will ensure the ruination of this country, and, IF they must be ‘rescued’ then they ought be taken back to France, whence they came. The are illegal criminals.

bobthebuilder
bobthebuilder
Reply to  JAMES jenson
1 month ago

Most if any will never be returned..all to our expence for their entier life ..they just do not work..look at the facts about the muslim culture..

karen
karen
Reply to  bobthebuilder
30 days ago

Wow, none of you will be attending the celebration then.

What you may not be aware of is that the RNLI, like doctors have a moral responsibility to save all life. So no matter that many of the illegals likely will be future rapists, or into gang crime, knives, guns, using women as object to make money from, and forming gangs to hunt out young white children to be used in sex trade, they are classed as human and so they have no choice but to save them.

It would be a brave crew member who refused to save even these beings in our modern world. So lets not be too hard on them. But do see your point on never giving to them again.

ISlander
ISlander
Reply to  JAMES jenson
1 month ago

Another piece of filth who will be begging for help from the RNLI is he ever gets into trouble at sea.

ISlander
ISlander
Reply to  Kevin P Cook
1 month ago

You are filth, you know that, right?

 

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