Photo: Mark Godden/Twitter

PLANE DITCHES INTO THE SOLENT NEAR COWES

Photo: Jessica Williams

A plane has crash landed into the Solent between Cowes and Calshot this afternoon (Sunday).

The light aircraft came down unexpectedly whilst flying West to East sometime before 15:00.

Calshot RNLI’s inshore lifeboats have been tasked to the scene but it is understood that nearby vessels have already pulled 2 people out of the water.

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The duo’s condition is unknown, but they are thought to have survived.

HM Coastguard have confirmed they are dealing with the ongoing incident at Calshot Spit.

UPDATE @ 15:40 – Aviation enthusiasts have confirmed that the plane is a Cirrus SR22, which is understood to have left Dunkeswell Airfield in Exeter for Solent Airport at Lee-on-Solent at around 14:10 BST.

The aircraft appears to have been flying at around 1,600ft and at 130kts before suddenly losing altitude at 14:41, plummeting to 800ft before dropping off radar tracking.

Photos show that the plane’s Cirrus Airframe Parachute System- a type of parachute attached to the fuselage – was deployed successfully.

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The Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) will be informed of the crash and an investigation will be launched.

UPDATE @ 16:58 – HM Coastguard has issued a statement on the incident:

“At 2.43pm this afternoon, HM Coastguard received numerous reports that a light aircraft had ditched into the water off Calshot Spit on the Solent.

“It was confirmed two people were on-board the aircraft. Both people were able to climb out of the aircraft after it came down and were then rescued by a nearby vessel.

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“Hamble independent lifeboat escorted both casualties to Hamble Lifeboat Station. Neither person required medical assistance and both were declared well by the South Central Ambulance Service. They also made contact with Hampshire Police at the lifeboat station.

“The aircraft is now beached at Calshot and Lymington Coastguard Rescue Team are securing it. The Air Accident Investigation Branch have been informed.

“Any possible pollution damage will be assessed and the Maritime & Coastguard Agency’s Duty Counter Pollution and Salvage Officer has been informed”.

The views/opinions expressed in these comments are solely those of the author and do not represent those of Island Echo. House rules on commenting must be followed at all times.
42 Comments
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Terry
Terry
1 year ago

Is it normal to have a parachute in a light aircraft.

Duane
Duane
Reply to  Terry
1 year ago

Not a private one no

Tony Marsh
Tony Marsh
Reply to  Terry
1 year ago

Quite a few light aircraft now have a parachute fitted for the plane itself. Incase of loss of power , pull the schute and the plane floats down .

John simpson
John simpson
Reply to  Tony Marsh
1 year ago

As far as I am aware only the Cirrus aircraft have a ballistic airframe recovery system.

Don't tell him pike.
Don't tell him pike.
Reply to  John simpson
1 year ago

A lot of new 3 axis microlights have them fitted CTSW etc .use as a last resort .better to carry out a forced landing in a field if poss .better chance of saving the aircraft.
But if ditching in water better to come down vertically ,especially if you have a fixed undercarriage .

Chris
Chris
Reply to  Don't tell him pike.
1 year ago

I’ve got a fixed undercarriage!

Peter Terry
Peter Terry
Reply to  John simpson
1 year ago

plenty of aircraft now have them fitted….including trike type microlights….

Phil
Phil
Reply to  Tony Marsh
1 year ago

A loss of power would not be a reason to deploy a chute.

Dippy
Dippy
Reply to  Terry
1 year ago

Yes

Don't tell him pike.
Don't tell him pike.
Reply to  Terry
1 year ago

It’s a ballistic recovery system for the aircraft not the pilot .

Isaac
Isaac
Reply to  Terry
1 year ago

Most don’t but I believe all (or at least all new) Cirrus made aircraft have them installed. Mainly just on the single engine ones

Steve Clark
Steve Clark
Reply to  Terry
1 year ago

Not normally in the old designs of the sixties and seventies but it’s a standard fit in Cirrus which was designed in the late nineties.

Wingnut
Wingnut
Reply to  Terry
1 year ago

Yes many light aircraft have them.

Stephen Thomas
Stephen Thomas
Reply to  Terry
1 year ago

Yes this type of aircraft has a parachute fitted.

Clare
Clare
Reply to  Terry
1 year ago

Normal or not, thank God they did.

Tom W.
Tom W.
Reply to  Terry
1 year ago

How rude.

greybeard
greybeard
Reply to  Terry
1 year ago

it is a growing trend to have one

Tom
Tom
1 year ago

A plane went over haylands about 115 today and i said to the wife that sounds a bit like the engine is not right

Ditch
Ditch
Reply to  Tom
1 year ago

I heard that too. The sound caught my ear because it sounded unusual. I hope all are safe

John Gullible
John Gullible
Reply to  Ditch
1 year ago

I live in similar area and saw and heard a plane going over my garden east to west. The engine stuttered then restarted.

mal
mal
1 year ago

i dont know why all aircraft cant have this parachute system, think of the lives it would save.

Wingnut
Wingnut
Reply to  mal
1 year ago

Not so – you have no control where it’s going to land – church steeple, power lines, you are a passenger not a pilot at that stage.

Don't tell him pike.
Don't tell him pike.
Reply to  Wingnut
1 year ago

.

Duane
Duane
1 year ago

Even the Milk Tray man is struggling these days …..

Richard collins
Richard collins
Reply to  Duane
1 year ago

You win! 😀

Captain chaos
Captain chaos
1 year ago

Yes, the whole aircraft parachute is becoming more common. It’s role is to slow decent to a survivable crash speed, great idea especially over water

Captain chaos
Captain chaos
1 year ago

The chute is attached to the fuselage, as opposed to a person and it slows the whole aircraft down

Captain chaos
Captain chaos
1 year ago

The other difference is its a ballistic system, meaning it is fired out, rather than just reliance on the air as it falls to open it. It fires upwards and opens rapidly.

https://www.skybrary.aero/index.php/Aircraft_Ballistic_Recovery_System

F Brownsill
F Brownsill
1 year ago

Surprised it landed upside down. Ok . Ish. On water, so long as you get out. Could be nasty on land.

Captain chaos
Captain chaos
Reply to  F Brownsill
1 year ago

The deployment of the parachute is a double edged sword , whist it will slow the rate of decent, it will also immediately arrest Forward speed, so no longer gliding or flying level. The parachute is deployed via a solid state rocket, so it goes up and opens rather than relying on the body of weight falling to open it, it’s very instant. When an aircraft has no forward motion, it becomes like a stone and falls vertically, as opposed to having a glide path, the heaviest part being the engine/engines up front so it will come down nose first as the parachute is attached behind the cockpit. So on landing its just as likely to turn upside down. When you look at a plan coming down slowly nose first, the odds are the top is heavier than the bottom.

Neil Murgatroyd
Neil Murgatroyd
Reply to  Captain chaos
1 year ago

they are rigged to descend level, but they start off a bit nose down. As said below, the parachute can drag the plane over AFTER landing

Don't tell him pike.
Don't tell him pike.
Reply to  F Brownsill
1 year ago

,

Steve Clark
Steve Clark
Reply to  F Brownsill
1 year ago

It will have landed the right way up. The parachute drag would have dragged it over.

kevin
kevin
Reply to  F Brownsill
1 year ago

i saw it go down it went nose first into the water then uprighted the pilot and passenger got out then about 15 min later it sunk with the parachute still inflated dragging the plane to shore as it was dragging it it flipped over

Mark
Mark
1 year ago
Captain chaos
Captain chaos
1 year ago

The parachute system is a double edged sword, whist it will slow decent it will also arrest all forward motion so there is no longer a glide path. The weight of the aircraft is predominantly at the front with the engine or engines, so the plane will come down vertically, nose first.
The parachute is deployed via a rocket fired upwards and does rely on the falling body to open it in the air, which would be too slow and require more height. It all happens very fast. When the plane hits the ground nose first, the majority of the weight is at the top, so it will likely end up upside down. It’s only used when a gliding non powered landing is not possible.

Paddy
Paddy
1 year ago

They used to assemble them at Bembridge Airport.

Tom
Tom
1 year ago

So is lock down over then?

Chris
Chris
Reply to  Tom
1 year ago

Yup – float down is the new black!

Phil
Phil
1 year ago

One more time, CAPS system has saved lives. I love the Cirrus.

test
test
1 year ago

Test

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