THE ONLY WAY IS ESSEX? GROUP SET UP TO PRESERVE ISLAND LINE TRAIN

A new group has been formed with the aim of securing one of the current Island Line trains for operational preservation on the mainland as South Western Railway look to offload the current stock in the coming months.

The London Transport Traction Group (LTTG) is hoping to secure a complete Class 483 train for operational preservation on a suitable heritage railway. If successful, the train will be converted so that it can operate under its own power, i.e. using batteries, rather than by picking up power via an electrified third rail.

Conversations are currently underway with the Epping Ongar Railway in Essex, with a view to storing and operating the former London Underground train there following conversion to being self-powered.

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The Epping Ongar line was part of London Underground’s Central Line until 1994, so it provides the ideal mainland home for one of these historic 1938 stock tube trains.

A spokesman from the Epping Ongar Railway has said:

“Given our strong links with the Underground we’re very excited about the possibility of seeing a unit like this run under its own. We’ve had informal discussions with the LTTG and look forward to seeing more details soon. Though we’re some way away the concept of bringing tubes back to our line is something that we support – after all we did just that in 2014!”

The London Transport Traction Group has begun opening up fundraising channels in response to South Western Railway’s announcement regarding the disposal of these trains. More information can be found at http://www.lttractiongroup.co.uk/pledges-and-fundraising.html.

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It has been suggested that the Isle of Wight Steam Railway may also be looking at preserving one of the Island Line trains.

If you are interested in publishing a news piece on our group’s plans to return one of these trains to a former London Underground line, we would be delighted to hear from you! We cannot, however, provide information on the Isle of Wight Steam Railway’s preservation plans.

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The views/opinions expressed in these comments are solely those of the author and do not represent those of Island Echo. House rules on commenting must be followed at all times.
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Janice Pegg
Janice Pegg
1 year ago

As we have so many ‘train’ journey TV programmes I can honestly say that in the most poorest places on Earth, I have never seen a train in as poor an external condition as our as seen in the photograph.
 
Surely a couple of gallons of paint and a couple of rollers would at least hide some of the rust and flaking paint.
 
Even the Indians who are supposedly poorer than here in their mountain railways have better rolling stock than us.
 
Really makes you realise how poor the UK is now.

J D
J D
Reply to  Janice Pegg
1 year ago

Why bother painting an 85 year old heap of junk that’s being replaced soon?

Blockatubie
Blockatubie
Reply to  J D
1 year ago

Self respect for one, because it is of little cost and effort, because it is an disgrace to all who arrive here. And because it shows pride.
 
Clearly all things unimportant to the dull and ignorant.

Arthur Sausage
Arthur Sausage
1 year ago

Just hope the new rolling stock is more reliable than the chain ferryM

Blockatubie
Blockatubie
Reply to  Arthur Sausage
1 year ago

At least unlike the floating, aka static bridge, the ‘new’ trains are old so well tried and tested.
 
I have NOTHING against older modes of transport, just need a little tlc and likely better than most new machines as we see with the ‘great white elephant’ of the floating bridge saga
 
 

oldbutalive
oldbutalive
1 year ago

The rusting frames are aluminium and reacting to the salt in the sea air.
They have been doing that since they arrived over 20 years ago, they have just stopped cleaning it off and repainting it appears.
 
The new old stock, after being refitted, should be more reliable than whats left of the current stock, but not sure if the ride quality will be any better.

Blockatubie
Blockatubie
Reply to  oldbutalive
1 year ago

So long as most of the wheels are round, it may have a chance.
 
 

Level Phil
Level Phil
Reply to  oldbutalive
1 year ago

Aluminium does not rust. The reaction you describe is called corrosion.

Daniel Nash
Daniel Nash
Reply to  Level Phil
11 months ago

That being said, I believe the chassis are steel, not aluminium, so they have rusted. However, this appears to not be as serious as some are suggesting and at least one of the extant units is currently still under overhaul, with a freshly overhauled set of bogies to boot. It’s not an impossible task.

William Dunnet
William Dunnet
11 months ago

Makes me laugh that people think a lick of paint and everything works again. Rather have a train out working with the rust that’s showing, than nicely painted and out of service for over a year train like 007.

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